c3_elemental living

INNOVATIVE HOUSING
M.SC. – LEIBNIZ UNIVERSITÄT HANNOVER
02.2020 – 1. SEMESTER

This project was realised as part of the Baukultur und Prozesskommunikation: Innovative Housing project. We worked closely with the cooperative Ecovillage Hannover, whom we made an architectural proposal for. However, it is important to notice that this is a hypothetical, free-to-access concept without any commercial / development intentions.

The individual approach was to be chosen freely. We formed a group of three and opted for an interdisciplinary approach incorporating landscape planning, urbanism and architecture. Paola Ayala developed the landscape concept, Vivian Chan the tiny houses and myself the multistorey buildings.

Figure ground plan with proposed morphology (darker)

c stands for collective, collaborative, cooperative
3 developed areas (landscape, multistorey, tiny houses); three areas of sustainability (social, ecological, economical)

_elemental living: Dwelling reduced to the essential, which goes beyond our basic needs – the relationship with the people around, with nature, and with ourselves. This implies a redefinition (and not a reduction) of our current living standards and our common understanding of living space.

_ecological: The homogeneous horizontal circulation through outside galleries bridging between buildings along with the visual and conceptual landscape integration means a constant contact with the natural exterior (the “elements”). This is beneficial and truly reflects the ecological intentions of the cooperative.

This project was realised as part of the Baukultur und Prozesskommunikation: Innovative Housing project. We worked closely with the cooperative Ecovillage Hannover, whom we made an architectural proposal for. However, it is important to notice that this is a hypothetical, free-to-access concept without any commercial / development intentions.

The individual focus was to be chosen freely. We formed a group of three and opted for an interdisciplinary approach incorporating landscape planning, urbanism and architecture. Paola Ayala developed the landscape concept, Vivian Chan the tiny houses and myself the multistorey buildings.

c stands for collective, collaborative, cooperative
3 developed areas (landscape, multistorey, tiny houses); three areas of sustainability (social, ecological, economical)

_elemental living: Dwelling reduced to the essential, which goes beyond our basic needs – the relationship with the people around, with nature, and with ourselves. This implies a redefinition (and not a reduction) of our current living standards and our common understanding of living space.

_ecological: The homogeneous horizontal circulation through outside galleries bridging between buildings along with the visual and conceptual landscape integration means a constant contact with the natural exterior (the “elements”). This is beneficial and truly reflects the ecological intentions of the cooperative.

Figure ground plan with proposed morphology (darker)

Masterplan with landscape concept from P. Ayala

Masterplan with landscape concept from Paola Ayala

_social

Plentiful, qualitative communal spaces, green areas and galleries all act as a natural extension of the living area. Formal / informal meeting points and centralized / decentralized communal areas underline concepts like sharing, exchange and mutual support, fostering a sense of community and belonging.

 

Modular units


Community building

Top to bottom, left to right:

Ground floor plan with public uses
Top floor plan (version A)
Top floor plan (version B)

Ground floor plan with public uses
Top floor plan with co-working spaces

_modular building

Modular, standarised units enable a cost- and energy-efficient building process. These units are combinable and offer highly customisable spaces adaptable for different uses, from public / communal to private.
Floor plan of standard living module
Slight rotation for optimisation of light and wind conditions

_participation

It starts with the process. As a part of such, this project is not a building proposal, but rather a vision of what Ecovillage Hannover could be. Given that the future residents’ wishes were central for its development, inspiration can be hopefully drawn from this vision and help form ideas which, when discussed, become the very core of participative planning and building.