FINNISH REGIONAL SHOP

HOLZBAU LANDHANDEL SEMINAR
PROF. MICHAEL SCHUMACHER
M.SC. – LEIBNIZ UNIVERSITÄT HANNOVER
02.2021 – 3. SEMESTER

TEAMWORK WITH HAUKE SAATHOF

HOLZBAU LANDHANDEL
PROF. MICHAEL SCHUMACHER
M.SC. – LEIBNIZ UNIV. HANNOVER
02.2021 – 3. SEMESTER

TEAMWORK WITH H. SAATHOF

HOLZBAU LANDHANDEL SEMINAR
PROF. MICHAEL SCHUMACHER
M.SC. – LEIBNIZ UNIVERSITÄT HANNOVER
02.2021 – 3. SEMESTER

TEAMWORK WITH HAUKE SAATHOF

This design of this small shop is based on the principle of the Kote, a traditional, tent-like wooden construction, which has been built by the ethnic group of the Sámi for centuries. The typology of the Kote was taken as a basis and reinterpreted with the help of modern timber construction techniques to create a body which looks contemporary and, at the same time, timeless in its aesthetics.

Instead of an arched bar construction, a lattice structure of 48 wooden slats forms an ovoid which, due to the space-creating geometry with few connections, results in a very stable structure. A thatched roof is tied onto the wooden construction and serves as an effective protection against the elements. In addition, the building does not have a thermal envelope in order to keep the construction as simple as possible (and visible from the inside).

Location at a side street next to the highway

Floor plan

In the centre of the shop, there is a built-in furniture element, which consists of shelves, cabinets, the trust cash register, a small storage and a seating area for two people. Its uppermost surfaces are sloped to collect and then drain rainwater through a downpipe under the floor. The multifunctional element stands where the fireplace is traditionally placed — the opening in the roof now serves to flood the space with natural light.

Cross-sections (in German)

Sections with detailed support ring (left) and drainage (right) (in German)

The lifespan of the wooden building depends on the thatched roof, which must be renewed every 40 and up to 100 years. Through the open construction, optimal ventilation is achieved; the large opening facing north reduces the probabilty of fungus appeareance while also connecting the interior with its surroundings.

Reference projects:

Observation tower in Helsinki, Finnland by Ville Hara (left) and
Bird observatory Tij near Stellendam, Netherlands by RAU Architects + RO&AD Architects (right)

The body is positioned in such a way that it is easily visible for passing cars, so most travellers won’t miss the peculiar, lonely structure at the side of the road. Those who have time may stop, walk up, enter. And then buy fresh, regional cucumbers, perhaps.